Edmonton Restaurant Review: Wilfred’s

Check-in to Wilfred’s upon arrival.

Wilfred’s is one of the newest restaurants to dot the Edmonton landscape. It’s situated within the popular Brewery District inside a fairly nondescript 100-year-old vintage brick building that used to belong to the old Molson Brewery. Completely refurbished, the heritage space is now unrecognizable. The interior is a wash of light woods, a mix of pink and white accents, dark metals, and whimsical art from Vanguard Works.

The Pink Blazer was the weekly Pink Drink sometime in October.

Even though Wilfred’s, a contemporary diner, had opened by the official start of summer 2018, Kirk and I held off on our visit. It wasn’t until a couple of weeks ago when we decided it was time to check it out. I’m not going to lie, it was their latest weekly featured Pink Drink ($13), The Pastel Blazer, that got me in the door. It was actually more bitter than I expected it to be, and the ingredients — vodka, Aperol, unsweetened coconut milk, lime juice, and egg white — had to be stirred regularly to avoid separation, but it was, overall, a smooth and refreshing beverage that lasted me through our dinner.

Everything about Wilfred’s is curated from the wallpaper to the menu.

To eat, the two of us split a couple of plates: Wilfred’s Burger ($18) with added white cheddar ($2) and soup ($3) subbed in for the usual fries, as well as the Fried Chicken & Prosciutto Cutlet ($25). Arguably the best thing about both dishes was the size as they were generously portioned. For the price, I’m glad to see that they didn’t skimp. However, I do feel that each one could use some improvement.

Beginning with the burger, this consisted of a hefty nine ounce patty of beef topped with bacon, lettuce, tomato and onion. It’s so thick that I found it rather difficult to unhinge my jaw to take a real bite out of the burger. The bun also didn’t fare too well as it slid around and fell apart as I ate. The meat itself was cooked to about a medium well, so it wasn’t completely colourless, but it also wasn’t as juicy as I hoped it would be. Thankfully, it was fresh though. It certainly didn’t seem to be a prefab patty, and, that, I’ll commend Wilfred’s for. Had it not been for the added cheese and the crispy bacon, the burger would have had relatively no flavour. I highly recommend that the restaurant creates a signature sauce to go with this menu item.

Cauliflower & Potato Soup with bacon and chives

The upgrade to their Cauliflower & Potato Soup was the saving grace to this dish. It was thick, creamy and smooth. When served hot, it makes for the perfect hearty soup to have during the onset of winter. The tiny bits of bacon and chives added a little fattiness and herbaceousness.

Fried Chicken & Prosciutto Cutlet

Our second plate of Fried Chicken & Prosciutto Cutlets was enormous. The two breasts or legs of meat had been pounded until evenly thin throughout. Layered with prosciutto and then breaded and fried, they were super crispy without tasting or feeling greasy. I could have used some more prosciutto as it was hard to discern its presence. Yet, upon careful inspection, I did see it there. If you try this, definitely squeeze some fresh lemon juice onto the chicken. The zest kicks the dish up a notch, and the acidity breaks down some of the salt. On the side was an arugula salad with tomatoes and Parmesan. This was a great accompaniment to the chicken. The sharp taste of the greens, the tartness of the tomatoes, and the pungency of the cheese paired very well with the meat.

Postcards designed by Vanguard Works are provided with the bill.

When all was said and done, our meal at Wilfred’s was a bit of a miss. Sure, the service was quite good, the atmosphere was pleasant (admittedly a tad cramped though), and they have an excellent bar program. Nevertheless, the food isn’t meeting it’s full potential. I understand that simplicity is key at times, but, in the case of Wilfred’s, the kitchen needs to do something to set themselves apart from the rest. Right now, they’re not. They should take a chance and be as playful with the menu as they are with the decor.

The interior of Wilfred’s is light and whimsical.

Edmonton Restaurant Review: DOSC Restaurant

DOSC Bar

Sometimes a business comes along and it completely changes the game. After a handful of visits since they opened a month ago, I’d now safely say that DOSC Restaurant is one that falls in that category. Located on 104 Street and 102 Avenue in the downtown core of Edmonton, it resides in a seemingly “cursed” space (four other eateries have shut down in the past few years); however, I’m truly hoping that this ambitious cafe/bar/steakhouse defies the odds.

Previously, upon the launch of DOSC, I had written a preview post about my experience at one of their media dinners. It was a night that I’ll remember for a long time to come, not only because of the offerings and the people, but also for the showmanship. Today, I really want to delve into the menu, focusing on all of the food and drinks I’ve had the pleasure of trying thus far.

After the dinner Kirk and I attended before their official opening, I wasn’t too keen on putting an actual review of the food out there right away. While we got to sample an array of items that they would be serving at the restaurant, I didn’t know what the actual size of the dishes would be like and, of course, during a media event, it’s always going to be their best foot forward. So, it was hard to judge the place properly based off of the one night.

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Plates that we were presented with at the preview event included: Tostada, Pate, Sweetbreads & Tendons, Wagyu Tartare, Marrow Mash, Pickled Asparagus, Liver & Onions, Tongue, Brisket, Miyazaki Chuck Wagyu, Hickory Smoked Chocolate, and Pineapple Cake. Almost every one still resides on the current soft opening menu in some form or another. As they continue to receive feedback they are tweaking the dishes to find the best fit. Eventually, the tongue to tail menu will be expanded to fully encompass the whole animal as available options, at the moment, are limited to slightly more common offals.

Tostada

Personally, I wasn’t a big fan of the Liver & Onions more due to the metallic taste than the texture. I also wouldn’t necessarily go out of my way to order the Sweetbreads & Tendons, which were cooked until very tender, but just not a mouthfeel that I’m too keen on. Everything else was excellent though. I especially liked the Tostada with its layers of chipotle crema, salsa verde, feta, Brussels sprouts, avocado mousse and quail egg. It was light and complex. Hints of Chef de Cuisine Israel Alvarez’s Mexican upbringing shone through and it was a standout. It used to be found on their breakfast menu, but is now listed on their dinner menu and served with beef tongue ($12).

Tongue

Speaking of the tongue, the only way to try this fantastic selection right now is with the Tostada. Their latest menu was recently updated, taking away the choice of ordering the tongue in three, six or nine ounce portions. Still, take a chance on it. Tongue is typically quite tough. Here, at DOSC, they cook it sous vide until it’s incredibly tender, like the best cut of steak.

Wagyu Tartare

I have a tendency to lean towards tartares. The Wagyu version ($18) here is exceptional. The meat melts in your mouth and it pairs well with the potato bread that they make in-house. Just be aware that the portion of meat is only about three ounces, so it’s not a lot. Wagyu is pricey as it is, let alone to be importing it to Edmonton, so it’s understandable that it’s not going to be the usual amount of beef tartare that may be seen at other local establishments.

Miyazaki Chuck Wagyu

If money’s no object, do order the Miyazaki Wagyu ($59 for six ounces or $88 for 9 ounces). I’d probably opt for the rib eye cut with the horseradish, volcanic salt and arugula butter. The meat has a beautiful flavour and a gorgeous texture.

Both of the sweets were fantastic. The Pineapple Cake ($9) is served upside down with a walnut honey ricotta, salted rum caramel and tarragon créme. It’s very decadent and quite sweet. Some think it’s sacrilegious to share dessert, but this one and their tart (to be discussed below) are perfect to be split. Their ice cream and sorbet, on the other hand, are recommended for one. The Hickory Smoked Chocolate Sorbet ($9) is to die for. Last I’d noticed, it’s still being served at the table in a bell jar filled with smoke. It’s kind of theatric and fun to order for that reason alone. The sorbet is made with Mayan 70 per cent dark chocolate, morita flake (chili) and smoked espresso salt. Creamier than expected, it’s got a distinct smokiness to it while retaining a little sweetness and a hint of spice at the end.

DOSC Bar Menu

We found ourselves downtown one weekend shortly after and decided to drop in for a night cap. This time, we sat in their cafe, which is towards the front of the space with windows overlooking 104 Street. It’s comfortable and cozy with such a pretty cafe counter. We started off with some alcoholic beverages. Those who lean towards beer will have a decent local selection (think Blindman Brewing, etc.) from their twelve rotating taps. In fact, one of my favourites that they seem to keep regularly is the WTF Raspberry Sour from Situation Brewing (around $8).

For those who prefer cocktails, they have a stellar team at the bar. The Rose + Leaf ($11) and Transom Sour ($11) are my drinks of choice. Both are great to sip through dinner, although the Rose + Leaf, with it’s underlying flavour of lychee and top note of watermelon, is more refreshing and ideal for those hot summer days. They even have a few mocktails on the menu for anyone who doesn’t or can’t imbibe.

Matcha Latte

In terms of the DOSC cafe, I find the cost of the drinks to be pretty much on par with any other specialty coffee shop in the city. The beans here come from Rogue Wave Coffee. Unfortunately, I don’t drink coffee, so I can’t really talk much about that. My beverage of late is definitely their Matcha Latte ($5). While most other places in Edmonton mix ones that are much sweeter, their baristas use pure matcha with milk. It results in a much stronger flavour. For some, it may be too bitter, but I love it.

Our third visit was with friends over supper. We went to town that night. Kirk ended up ordering the 16 oz. T-Bone Steak ($30). This was pan seared and simply seasoned with salt and extra pepper. The flavour of the meat was allowed to come through rather than masking it with a heavy sauce. On the side, they put a dollop of their freshly grated purple horseradish that has been pickled with cabbage, sherry and corn nectar. It works really well with the beef. To go with the steak, Kirk also went for their Daily Bread ($4). Kirk thought it was delicious, but with just two slices of the bread and a square of cultured butter, it was a tad expensive. Had the slices been thicker, the bread may have been justifiable, but they were very thin pieces. He also chose the Russet Fries ($5), which were an amazing starch. Thick, hand cut potatoes are whole wheat crusted, infusing them with an intense flavour and creating a nice crisp outer shell.

I had enjoyed the tongue so much at the media dinner that I had to have it again as my protein on this evening. I selected the three ounce size for $6, and it actually seemed like a more generous portion than that. It was also prepared as well as I remembered. I combined that dish with their Brussels Sprouts ($8) and Brown Barley Fried Rice ($9). Between the two sides, the Brussels sprouts was, hands down, the better. Don’t get me wrong, I liked the rice with it’s leeks, funghi, crispy ginger egg, and pickled shallot, but it had almost too slick of a texture over the rice and the mushrooms were a little bland. The Brussels sprouts were awesome though! Big, round Brussels were cooked thoroughly. The outer leaves were charred and crisp. Tossed with large, perfectly cooked pancetta and using an egg white foam and cured yolk as a sauce, it’s like no other Brussels sprout dish I’ve ever had.

Citrus Tart

Finishing off our date night, Kirk and I shared the Citrus Tart ($9). Made with whisked egg yolks to create a sabayon custard, this dessert utilizes a handful of citruses: lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, and yuzu. It holds their essence without becoming overly sour and the sugariness is light, too. On the palate, the pastry shell is more like a butter cookie and the custard is creamy.

My latest visit was with another friend of mine for an early dinner after work this week. We decided to share four items. Since we both have an affinity for Brussels sprouts, that was a repeat dish. Yet, I did make a point of trying some new to me things: Pappardelle ($9) and Skirt Steak ($13 for 6 ounces). We also got a bowl of the Marrow Mash ($5). Regarding the latter, this is just such a rich take on mashed potatoes. The use of marrow makes the Yukon potatoes taste butterier than butter itself. The herb oil is a nice touch, adding a bit of earthiness. Stir it up to get the best flavour profile. The green pappardelle is freshly made and tossed with garlic leek, roasted garlic oil, kampot red peppercorn, and lemon. The oil makes it a little slippery in texture, but the overall taste is great and it’s different from the typical saucy pasta.

Skirt Steak

The star of the evening was definitely the skirt steak. This cut is smoked with juniper and dry rubbed with espresso cocoa grounds from Rogue Wave Coffee. It’s delectable. My friend, who isn’t even a huge fan of steak, said it was her favourite dish of the night. Usually, skirt steak is not the best cut to order. It can often be overcooked and chewy. DOSC handles the meat with precision. Seared so the juices stay in the steak, it’s actually superbly succulent. No word of a lie, it’s probably one of the best things I’ve eaten in a while.

Earl Grey Ice Cream

Added to the dessert menu this week was an Earl Grey Ice Cream ($9). It was infused with orange and rosemary and topped with sponge toffee. I’m usually not one to order ice cream from a restaurant as it’s sort of costly for what you’re getting. But, it was the only dessert I hadn’t tried. I’m also weary of tea-flavoured desserts because it’s often the case that the flavour doesn’t come through enough. Surprisingly, DOSC managed to saturate the ice cream with the earl grey taste.

DOSC seems to have found early success. Patrons steadily come in and out whenever I’ve been there, and, on weekends, it’s clearly a bustling place until closing. From my perspective, DOSC is getting better and better. Each time I go, it’s evolving and improving. The service is impeccable and the team behind it is fantastic. Honestly, my hope is that it’s just too good to fail.

Edmonton Restaurant Preview: DOSC Restaurant

Welcomed to the freight elevator with sparkling wine by Tony Britton.

Intrigue and mystery laid the groundwork for our night at DOSC Restaurant (their original moniker and subsequent change to appease the AGLC further lends itself to the story of how they came to be; ask anyone working there for details suggested by their logo). Instructed to enter from the rear door, a select few of us were led into an old freight elevator and then dropped off in a narrow hallway that would be the scene of our theatrical meal for much of the evening (hosted by operating partner Shangeeta Prasad).

The friendly servers were asked to remain stoic while taking away and dropping off our dishes throughout. But, meeting a number of them once dinner ended, it was obvious they found it difficult to keep straight faces. Several of them broke character and let their personalities shine through (hello to the guy who shimmied his way out at one point!). I don’t actually think DOSC is going to go that route once the business officially opens tomorrow. However, it certainly reminded me of what I might call an experiential restaurant found in the likes of New York City or similar. It’s definitely something one would never forget. Although it’s unlikely DOSC will plan this style of pop-up presentation again, there’s a chance they can be convinced to do it for private events.

It was intimate with a very strong focus on the food. Introductions from the chefs for each dish prepped us for what we were about to ingest. And, let’s just say that the menu isn’t exactly for the faint of heart. The meal took us from the nose to the tail of the animal, meaning we tried everything from tongue to sweetbread to liver. While some of the menu items may not be to everyone’s taste, the kitchen certainly works their magic with a couple of the plates by turning often roughly textured meats (i.e. tongue) into the tenderest, most luxurious bites. Adventurous diners may be greatly rewarded for branching out.

Miyazaki Chuck Wagyu

With Alberta being known for producing high quality beef, it’s interesting to note that Edmonton doesn’t really have any local restaurants that truly specialize in cooking this specific protein. Any that you can think of tend to be chain restaurants. That’s why owner and chef Jake Lee of Seoul Fried Chicken wanted to introduce themselves as a steakhouse despite the many hats DOSC will be wearing. They have an open kitchen with an in-house butchery and a dry aging cooler to cure their own meats. An extensive list of 22 cuts will be available with just two types of beef being imported from outside of Canada (ex. $100 per pound melt-in-your-mouth Wagyu beef).

Along with chef de cuisine Israel Alvarez, their first seasonal menu attempts to bring recognizable dishes that are borderline creative to the table. The twelve courses we tried had mainly Canadian and Mexican influences with a very subtle hint of Asian flavour in the Wagyu Tartare. According to Jake, depending on what’s available during the year and their inspiration (such as special guest chefs), watch for the menus to change every so often. Don’t ever expect to see a regular old burger served here though. With so many places in Edmonton doing that already, they want to do other things better. Led by bar manager Tony Britton, drink pairings are of high importance at DOSC, too. Phenomenal wine like the Rioja Tempranillo and beer like Situation Brewing‘s WTF Raspberry Ginger Sour were excellent additions to our supper.

Ox and Cat

DOSC resides on the corner of 104 Street and 102 Avenue in the historic Metals Building, which used to be home to Ric’s Grill (eventually rebranded to Ric’s on 104), The Burg and, lastly, Stage 104. People say the location is cursed, but maybe the spot just needs the right people behind it. Plus, with the Ice District/Rogers Place now just down the street, the foot traffic and potential clientele is much higher than ever before.

The DOSC team is ambitious. The amount of overhead to run the place is sort of unfathomable. Thinking of this media black out event we attended, there were at least 20 servers, several staff in the kitchen, bartenders, baristas and managers on hand. Every single one of those people gave it their all to create a spectacular show for ten very lucky people.

After much anticipation, with one last course to go (Pineapple Upside-Down Cake for dessert), we were, again, led into the elevator, out the back entrance and around the building for the big reveal. Initially, curtains blocked our view of the restaurant interior and exterior windows were covered, so it was like something out of HGTV. When it appeared before us, we were greeted by a gorgeous, large room broken out into four distinct spaces — cafe, lounge, bar and dining room — to match unique menus and courses offered throughout the long days. They’ll be open as early as 7am for breakfast and before work coffee (supplied by local roastery Rogue Wave) and closing as late as 2am on weekends to accommodate their patrons and the neighbourhood.

Bricks made in the North Saskatchewan River have been left in place.

They’ve also done their best to retain as much of the 100+ year history (constructed in 1914) as possible by showcasing the walls built from bricks made in the North Saskatchewan River and keeping the original wooden pillars. The rest of space has been completely customized and revamped with elegant, hip, and modern touches meant to bring personality to the venue while still feeling comfortable.

So much careful thought went into the execution of DOSC. For the staff, it’s about the journey and process that gets them to the final result, and, from what we can tell, they’re well on their way to making a positive first impression. The whole team elevated our entire experience last night, so much so that we’re planning on being there for their first real dinner service tomorrow evening (Sunday, July 22). Those interested in checking out DOSC for themselves are encouraged to either make a reservation through OpenTable or walk right in starting at 9am.

Edmonton Restaurant Review: The Harvest Room (Full Breakfast Buffet)

My first run at the Full Buffet.

I’ve been to The Harvest Room at the Fairmont Hotel Macdonald several times over the past few years, but the last time I wrote about it was just over four years ago. A recent visit, prompted by the purchase of a Groupon, is giving me the chance to talk about this downtown Edmonton spot once more. This time, instead of coming in during lunch or stopping by for dinner, my family and I opted to meet up for breakfast bright and early on a Sunday morning.

Street parking on Sundays is free, so it’s possible to find spaces nearby without having to pay for the use of a lot or for the Fairmont’s valet services. The rest of the week, it will cost to park until at least 6:00pm. We had made reservations for 9:30am, and we arrived right on time. Before we were led into the dining room, the host hung up our coats in the closet, and he also requested our Groupon voucher. In this instance, the deal was a $100 value for $65 to be used on a Sunday to Thursday towards breakfast or dinner. However, I also managed to get an additional 25 per cent off with a promo code, which dropped the price down to $48.75. The original offer is still currently available.

Our table of four was seated next to one of the big windows, allowing us a great view of the entire restaurant and the patio. The space isn’t all that big and it’s not as regal as I’d assume a Fairmont dining room would be. It is classically styled though, and the servers are all dressed more formally. There’s even a window into the kitchen, so you can watch the staff as they work. It starts to feel like a fancier place when it’s apparent that they will bring brand new cutlery every time you begin eating off of a new plate.

French toast, bread pudding and a pastry.

The breakfast menu ranges from $12 for a Super Green Smoothie to $26 for a House-Cured Hot Smoked Salmon Benedict. It’s certainly not cheap. Especially when any additional drinks, including coffee, tea, and juice, are $5 each. Although, they do offer the value option of a coffee or tea with juice for $8. Taking all of that into account, it just made sense for our group to go with their Full Buffet option ($31.50 each). For about the same price as a single dish with a drink, we’d get unlimited fresh fruit, smoked salmon, domestic cheeses, yogurts, assorted cereals, bagels, toast, pastries, eggs benedict, french toast, bread pudding, crispy bacon, sausage, scrambled eggs, omelettes, breakfast potatoes, and the daily smoothie. Plus, coffee or tea, and juice — I questioned whether or not the orange juice was actually fresh as indicated on the menu — comes with it as well.

From the Continental Buffet, the best item you’ll find for the value is the smoked salmon.

Personally, I wasn’t super impressed with the Continental Buffet ($21.50) selection as I found the bagels to be kind of hard like they weren’t made fresh and there wasn’t much in the way of cheeses. The fruits were alright. I particularly enjoyed the pineapple and watermelon. Both were juicy and sweet. I also will commend the pastry chef because the mini danishes that I ate were delicately flaky and soft. Otherwise, it’s only worth the money if you’re a fan of smoked salmon and yogurt-based smoothies. Eat as much of the house-cured fish as you can and drink a couple of glasses of the daily smoothie to completely justify the cost. But, really, for an extra $10, it seems like a no-brainer to just go with the Full Buffet. While I didn’t try the eggs benedict or the scrambled eggs (I’m not a fan of eggs that have been sitting for periods of time), I made an effort to sample everything else.

Prairie Omelette made fresh to order.

First off, I’ll say that I appreciate the fact that, even though it is a buffet, they’ll take omelette orders at the table, so the dish is freshly cooked and comes hot from the kitchen. I chose the Prairie Omelette, which is usually $23 on its own, served with potatoes and tomatoes. Filled with boar bacon lardons, charred peppers, tomatoes, green onion, smoked apple wood, and smoked cheddar cheese, it was okay. I definitely could have used more cheese, and I would have preferred a fluffier egg.

The bread pudding at the 12 o’clock position was so good, as were the mini danish pastries.

Again, items that sit out at the buffet in warmers are never going to be the best unless there’s high turnover. That’s why I wasn’t too keen on the french toast. The slices seemed kind of stale and the berries that were tossed into the pan looked as though they’d been heated a bit too long. On the other hand, the bread pudding was fantastic. When I lined up to get some of that, I was at first disappointed to see that the tray was missing. But, that turned to happiness when I saw that a new bowl of bread pudding was being brought out just as I reached the buffet. The sweet bread was subtly flavoured with cinnamon and a dusting of icing sugar. I paired it with a few strawberries I pulled from the tray. It’s simple, but tasty.

The breakfast potatoes were savoury and tossed with roasted tomatoes. They were the perfect accompaniment to the plump sausages and the copious amounts of crisp bacon strips that I had. Those were all perfectly prepared.

My pot of tea was included in the price of the Full Buffet.

All in, my family paid about $100 after tax and tip out of pocket. At $25 per person, the value was there. However, when it comes down to the regular price, this is more than I would typically spend on breakfast (I’ll take the $8 happy hour special at Earls over this any day). Yet, if it’s not too out of the way, you’ve got a big appetite, and you’re looking to treat yourself to something nice, the Full Buffet at The Harvest Room should be a contender. Go for the drinks, fish and meats, and fill out the rest of your meal with other sides such as the delicious pastries. Just keep in mind that the value lies in certain items and stick with those.

Edmonton Restaurant Review: Elm Cafe

The patio space outside Elm Cafe.

Recently, I’ve written pieces about two of Nate Box’s businesses: the established District Cafe at 10011 109 Street and the soon-to-open Salz at 10556 115 Street. He’s had a successful run with smaller eateries that focus on succinct menus made with locally sourced ingredients and products. Having already discussed half of Box’s ventures, this year seemed as good as any to work my way through all four. I still have to pay a visit to Little Brick, but now I can cross Elm Cafe off my list.

In all honesty, for at least two, maybe even three, years now, I’d been sitting on a gift certificate for Elm Cafe. Despite the incentive and my best intentions, I just always forgot to go. I knew that they made some delicious sandwiches though. After all, in the past, I had eaten some of their catering during a TEDx event held at the Citadel Theatre.

The tiny interior of the shop.

Last month, I couldn’t wait any longer. I was adamant about stopping by the shop to pick up some lunch for my family. My boyfriend and I dropped by on a Sunday before noon. It was easy enough to find free street parking on the block. When we walked up to the patio, I noticed a few outdoor tables spaced out nicely. Those spots provide the majority of what seats they have available. In the winter, only a couple of bar stools are to be found inside the cafe for in-house dining. It’s a tiny 200 square foot space with a counter, a kitchen and three staff that have their moves and duties coordinated down to a tee, so as not to stumble over one another.

The day’s menu changes regularly.

Thankfully, there wasn’t anyone waiting behind me to order, so I was able to take a bit of time to decide on what I wanted. The downside to their menu is that it’s regularly updated depending on what’s in stock, so the pizza and sandwiches change daily. I knew ahead of time that they offered early sandwiches (they open early at 7:30am to catch the worker bees in the mornings), lunch sandwiches, soup, salad, muffins, scones, cookies, and an assortment of beverages; however, the specifics were to be a surprise.

As I laid eyes on the menu, I took note of the fact that the day’s pizza and one of the lunch sandwiches had already been crossed off the board. Food sells out quickly here, so the best bet for the most choice is to stop in bright and early. Still, there were some good options. I ended up selecting the following to go: Early 1 ($8), Early 2 ($8), Livin la Sous Vide a Loca ($9), a raspberry white chocolate scone ($4), and a salted caramel ($1). The full package added up $30, which was exactly the amount I had to spend.

My order packaged and ready to take home.

Our food took slightly longer than expected as there was a mistake made with my order; however, it was quickly rectified. While the final sandwich was being prepared, I perused the items on the counter. They’ve sourced a handful of products made in Edmonton (teas, cordials and caramels) as well as craft roasted coffee from Victoria. Eventually, the wait paid off. My goods were bagged up and we were on our way to my parents for lunchtime.

As soon as we got to their house, I unpacked everything and plated the sandwiches. First off, I’ll just say that they did not make for the most photogenic dish; they looked like all bun and no filling. But, hopefully, the images here do them some justice. We split the three sandwiches into quarters for us to share. In spite of their large size, I’m not sure that was truly enough to feed four grown adults. The bread also wasn’t our favourite due to the texture. Regardless, they were decent, especially when it came to overall flavour.

Early 2: cauliflower, egg, crispy onions, greens, chili mayo, and cheese sauce.

I’ll begin with the Early 2. This was a cauliflower and egg sandwich with chili mayo, cheese sauce, crispy onions, and greens. I would have liked more egg for extra protein and for the cauliflower to be more prominent. Yet, this was a much tastier option than I would have expected. The slight bitterness from the arugula was offset by the combo of mayo and cheese, and those crispy onions added texture and saltiness.

Livin la Sou Vide a Loca

Livin la Sous Vide a Loca consisted of turkey, brie, cucumber, pickled onion, arugula, apple jelly, and herb aioli. What a fantastic combination of flavours in this one. This bun was a tad firmer and more toasted than the Early sandwiches, but it worked. The turkey was succulent, there was just a bit of sourness from the pickled onion, and the apple jelly brought in a hint of sweetness. Everything balanced with the creamy brie and the pungent aioli.

Early 1: chicken, egg, roast peppers, lemon, charred green onion, Gouda, and lemon aioli.

My personal favourite turned out to be the Early 1. A chicken sandwich with egg, roast peppers, charred green onion, greens, Gouda, and lemon aioli, this one packed a punch. Savoury with the meat, a little smoky due to the onion’s preparation, and zesty from the lemon, it was somewhat of a revelation. We all enjoyed this one.

Raspberry White Chocolate Scone

To finish off our meal, we split the moist raspberry white chocolate scone. It defied expectations by avoiding the dry quality of some of its counterparts. Even with a crunchy sugar topping, it refrained from being overly sweet. My only suggestion is that they try to spread out the raspberries and chocolate when they lay out the dough to bake because the distribution was quite uneven. I shared my salted caramel with my mom as our final dessert. I’m pretty sure that these are made by Erica Vliegenthart, the head baker at District Cafe, who sells her pies and caramels under the Red Balloon Pie Company name. The caramel was super soft and fresh. I would have happily eaten a dozen on the spot.

Salted Caramels

A meal from Elm Cafe was a long time coming. I’m glad that I finally tried it out. Although we thought there could be minor improvements made to the food, the important thing is it brought my family together for a lovely afternoon. Nate Box’s venues are grounded in the idea of community, and I think that he and his team are definitely succeeding in that respect.