Edmonton Restaurant Review: DOSC Restaurant

DOSC Bar

Sometimes a business comes along and it completely changes the game. After a handful of visits since they opened a month ago, I’d now safely say that DOSC Restaurant is one that falls in that category. Located on 104 Street and 102 Avenue in the downtown core of Edmonton, it resides in a seemingly “cursed” space (four other eateries have shut down in the past few years); however, I’m truly hoping that this ambitious cafe/bar/steakhouse defies the odds.

Previously, upon the launch of DOSC, I had written a preview post about my experience at one of their media dinners. It was a night that I’ll remember for a long time to come, not only because of the offerings and the people, but also for the showmanship. Today, I really want to delve into the menu, focusing on all of the food and drinks I’ve had the pleasure of trying thus far.

After the dinner Kirk and I attended before their official opening, I wasn’t too keen on putting an actual review of the food out there right away. While we got to sample an array of items that they would be serving at the restaurant, I didn’t know what the actual size of the dishes would be like and, of course, during a media event, it’s always going to be their best foot forward. So, it was hard to judge the place properly based off of the one night.

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Plates that we were presented with at the preview event included: Tostada, Pate, Sweetbreads & Tendons, Wagyu Tartare, Marrow Mash, Pickled Asparagus, Liver & Onions, Tongue, Brisket, Miyazaki Chuck Wagyu, Hickory Smoked Chocolate, and Pineapple Cake. Almost every one still resides on the current soft opening menu in some form or another. As they continue to receive feedback they are tweaking the dishes to find the best fit. Eventually, the tongue to tail menu will be expanded to fully encompass the whole animal as available options, at the moment, are limited to slightly more common offals.

Tostada

Personally, I wasn’t a big fan of the Liver & Onions more due to the metallic taste than the texture. I also wouldn’t necessarily go out of my way to order the Sweetbreads & Tendons, which were cooked until very tender, but just not a mouthfeel that I’m too keen on. Everything else was excellent though. I especially liked the Tostada with its layers of chipotle crema, salsa verde, feta, Brussels sprouts, avocado mousse and quail egg. It was light and complex. Hints of Chef de Cuisine Israel Alvarez’s Mexican upbringing shone through and it was a standout. It used to be found on their breakfast menu, but is now listed on their dinner menu and served with beef tongue ($12).

Tongue

Speaking of the tongue, the only way to try this fantastic selection right now is with the Tostada. Their latest menu was recently updated, taking away the choice of ordering the tongue in three, six or nine ounce portions. Still, take a chance on it. Tongue is typically quite tough. Here, at DOSC, they cook it sous vide until it’s incredibly tender, like the best cut of steak.

Wagyu Tartare

I have a tendency to lean towards tartares. The Wagyu version ($18) here is exceptional. The meat melts in your mouth and it pairs well with the potato bread that they make in-house. Just be aware that the portion of meat is only about three ounces, so it’s not a lot. Wagyu is pricey as it is, let alone to be importing it to Edmonton, so it’s understandable that it’s not going to be the usual amount of beef tartare that may be seen at other local establishments.

Miyazaki Chuck Wagyu

If money’s no object, do order the Miyazaki Wagyu ($59 for six ounces or $88 for 9 ounces). I’d probably opt for the rib eye cut with the horseradish, volcanic salt and arugula butter. The meat has a beautiful flavour and a gorgeous texture.

Both of the sweets were fantastic. The Pineapple Cake ($9) is served upside down with a walnut honey ricotta, salted rum caramel and tarragon créme. It’s very decadent and quite sweet. Some think it’s sacrilegious to share dessert, but this one and their tart (to be discussed below) are perfect to be split. Their ice cream and sorbet, on the other hand, are recommended for one. The Hickory Smoked Chocolate Sorbet ($9) is to die for. Last I’d noticed, it’s still being served at the table in a bell jar filled with smoke. It’s kind of theatric and fun to order for that reason alone. The sorbet is made with Mayan 70 per cent dark chocolate, morita flake (chili) and smoked espresso salt. Creamier than expected, it’s got a distinct smokiness to it while retaining a little sweetness and a hint of spice at the end.

DOSC Bar Menu

We found ourselves downtown one weekend shortly after and decided to drop in for a night cap. This time, we sat in their cafe, which is towards the front of the space with windows overlooking 104 Street. It’s comfortable and cozy with such a pretty cafe counter. We started off with some alcoholic beverages. Those who lean towards beer will have a decent local selection (think Blindman Brewing, etc.) from their twelve rotating taps. In fact, one of my favourites that they seem to keep regularly is the WTF Raspberry Sour from Situation Brewing (around $8).

For those who prefer cocktails, they have a stellar team at the bar. The Rose + Leaf ($11) and Transom Sour ($11) are my drinks of choice. Both are great to sip through dinner, although the Rose + Leaf, with it’s underlying flavour of lychee and top note of watermelon, is more refreshing and ideal for those hot summer days. They even have a few mocktails on the menu for anyone who doesn’t or can’t imbibe.

Matcha Latte

In terms of the DOSC cafe, I find the cost of the drinks to be pretty much on par with any other specialty coffee shop in the city. The beans here come from Rogue Wave Coffee. Unfortunately, I don’t drink coffee, so I can’t really talk much about that. My beverage of late is definitely their Matcha Latte ($5). While most other places in Edmonton mix ones that are much sweeter, their baristas use pure matcha with milk. It results in a much stronger flavour. For some, it may be too bitter, but I love it.

Our third visit was with friends over supper. We went to town that night. Kirk ended up ordering the 16 oz. T-Bone Steak ($30). This was pan seared and simply seasoned with salt and extra pepper. The flavour of the meat was allowed to come through rather than masking it with a heavy sauce. On the side, they put a dollop of their freshly grated purple horseradish that has been pickled with cabbage, sherry and corn nectar. It works really well with the beef. To go with the steak, Kirk also went for their Daily Bread ($4). Kirk thought it was delicious, but with just two slices of the bread and a square of cultured butter, it was a tad expensive. Had the slices been thicker, the bread may have been justifiable, but they were very thin pieces. He also chose the Russet Fries ($5), which were an amazing starch. Thick, hand cut potatoes are whole wheat crusted, infusing them with an intense flavour and creating a nice crisp outer shell.

I had enjoyed the tongue so much at the media dinner that I had to have it again as my protein on this evening. I selected the three ounce size for $6, and it actually seemed like a more generous portion than that. It was also prepared as well as I remembered. I combined that dish with their Brussels Sprouts ($8) and Brown Barley Fried Rice ($9). Between the two sides, the Brussels sprouts was, hands down, the better. Don’t get me wrong, I liked the rice with it’s leeks, funghi, crispy ginger egg, and pickled shallot, but it had almost too slick of a texture over the rice and the mushrooms were a little bland. The Brussels sprouts were awesome though! Big, round Brussels were cooked thoroughly. The outer leaves were charred and crisp. Tossed with large, perfectly cooked pancetta and using an egg white foam and cured yolk as a sauce, it’s like no other Brussels sprout dish I’ve ever had.

Citrus Tart

Finishing off our date night, Kirk and I shared the Citrus Tart ($9). Made with whisked egg yolks to create a sabayon custard, this dessert utilizes a handful of citruses: lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, and yuzu. It holds their essence without becoming overly sour and the sugariness is light, too. On the palate, the pastry shell is more like a butter cookie and the custard is creamy.

My latest visit was with another friend of mine for an early dinner after work this week. We decided to share four items. Since we both have an affinity for Brussels sprouts, that was a repeat dish. Yet, I did make a point of trying some new to me things: Pappardelle ($9) and Skirt Steak ($13 for 6 ounces). We also got a bowl of the Marrow Mash ($5). Regarding the latter, this is just such a rich take on mashed potatoes. The use of marrow makes the Yukon potatoes taste butterier than butter itself. The herb oil is a nice touch, adding a bit of earthiness. Stir it up to get the best flavour profile. The green pappardelle is freshly made and tossed with garlic leek, roasted garlic oil, kampot red peppercorn, and lemon. The oil makes it a little slippery in texture, but the overall taste is great and it’s different from the typical saucy pasta.

Skirt Steak

The star of the evening was definitely the skirt steak. This cut is smoked with juniper and dry rubbed with espresso cocoa grounds from Rogue Wave Coffee. It’s delectable. My friend, who isn’t even a huge fan of steak, said it was her favourite dish of the night. Usually, skirt steak is not the best cut to order. It can often be overcooked and chewy. DOSC handles the meat with precision. Seared so the juices stay in the steak, it’s actually superbly succulent. No word of a lie, it’s probably one of the best things I’ve eaten in a while.

Earl Grey Ice Cream

Added to the dessert menu this week was an Earl Grey Ice Cream ($9). It was infused with orange and rosemary and topped with sponge toffee. I’m usually not one to order ice cream from a restaurant as it’s sort of costly for what you’re getting. But, it was the only dessert I hadn’t tried. I’m also weary of tea-flavoured desserts because it’s often the case that the flavour doesn’t come through enough. Surprisingly, DOSC managed to saturate the ice cream with the earl grey taste.

DOSC seems to have found early success. Patrons steadily come in and out whenever I’ve been there, and, on weekends, it’s clearly a bustling place until closing. From my perspective, DOSC is getting better and better. Each time I go, it’s evolving and improving. The service is impeccable and the team behind it is fantastic. Honestly, my hope is that it’s just too good to fail.

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