Edmonton Restaurant Review: Riverbank Bistro (St. Albert)

Dessert in the form of Key Lime Pie!

After a day out at the Edmonton International Fringe Theatre Festival in August, Kirk and I decided to treat ourselves to dinner out. Instead of sticking around the busy area of Old Strathcona, we made the trek over to Riverbank Bistro in St. Albert. I’d read recent praise about the restaurant, which opened up inside the Victorian-Style house situated on Mission Avenue last fall, and I wanted to try it.

We showed up for our OpenTable reservation early (at about a quarter to 5:00pm), so I snapped some photos of the building and the interior of the house before we went inside. Interesting to note is that Riverbank Bistro also has a lounge serving a very different bites menu; however, it’s completely cutoff from the restaurant. The lounge actually has a different door on the right hand side of the foyer, accessible when you enter the building. The door to the left takes you into the main dining room.

The dining room is through a door on the left.

Upon our arrival we were greeted immediately. Although we could have requested to sit outside on the patio that overlooks the Sturgeon River, we ended up seated at a table for two inside. Personally, I believe we made the right choice seeing as how a couple that had originally opted to dine outside ended up shifting indoors. It sounded like the bugs were invading.

Prior to our visit, I had perused the Riverbank Bistro menu online. The list of classic items had an elevated air to them, and I was excited to sink my teeth into their offerings. What I didn’t realize was that on Sundays, the only menu they have available is their Sunday Feature Menu. It’s a two-course dinner that includes a starter and an entrée for $28.95 per person. While I’m all for the price, I was a tad disappointed that it was our only option. The menu provides four appetizers and three mains to choose from. My singular hope was that the chef had selected the best from their menu to showcase every Sunday.

If anything, the lack of choice made our decisions that much faster. Kirk decided on the Caesar Salad (normally $14) and the Roast AAA Alberta Beef Prime Rib (not on the usual menu). I ordered the R.B.B. Soup Creation (regularly $8) and the Pan Seared Salmon Fillet ($27 on its own). I also began my meal with a Mission Ave Mule ($13).

Caesar Salad

For the Caesar Salad, the kitchen refrained from chopping the romaine hearts. Instead, they cut them lengthwise, laying them open and then piling on the dressing, focaccia croutons, shaved Asiago, crispy capers, and grape tomatoes. To finish things off, it was topped with a grilled lemon slice. The juices from that created a charred acidity. I appreciated that the appropriate amount of dressing was used. More often than not, salads either have too much or too little dressing. In the case of Riverbank Bistro it was just right for me. Plus, the ample cheese helped. What kind of gave the Caesar salad a twist was the addition of those grape tomatoes, bringing a pop of tang and sweet here and there.

Roast AAA Alberta Beef Prime Rib

The Roast AAA Alberta Beef Prime Rib was decent. The meat looked to be cooked to a proper medium or medium rare. Yet, I found it to be a bit dry in spots. The rosemary jus was flavourful though, and the smashed potatoes were buttery. I kind of wish there had been more potato. Although, I suppose with a side of Yorkshire pudding, there was already enough starch to go around. Speaking of the Yorkshire pudding, Kirk called it his dessert. Most days he prefers salt to sugar, and I have to agree that Riverbank Bistro’s version is good. It had a crisp outer shell and a fluffy interior with a slight chew, ideal for soaking up leftover gravy. The roasted carrots and turnips were prepared nicely as well.

R.B.B. Soup Creation

The R.B.B. Soup Creation changes all the time, but boy did I luck out that weekend! The chef had made a creamy potato Asiago soup with caramelized onion and bacon. In my opinion, when it comes to soups, I can take or leave a broth. I’m all about an amazing cream soup, and this one was luxurious, to say the least. It was surprisingly smooth. Whatever they did to puree the potatoes, they were undetectable in terms of texture. It was warm, thick and creamy all the way down to the last drop. The flavours of the cheese, onions and bacon melded together perfectly. I’d go back to Riverbank Bistro simply for this.

Pan Seared Salmon Fillet

My main of Pan Seared Salmon Fillet was passable. I will give them props for the fish itself. The cut was large and it was pan seared so that none of the moisture was lost. The fish was succulent and flaky without falling apart too easily. I’m not entirely certain as to how it was seasoned. If I had to guess, I think it was simple salt and pepper with some maple syrup as it looked lightly caramelized on the top. What I wasn’t a huge fan of was the base of the dish, which consisted of an herbed spaetzle along with a bacon and corn succotash. I found the dill heavy handed and the overall taste saltier than I would like. While bites of the noodles seemed to help tone down the brininess, it was still a lot for my palate to take.

Mission Ave Mule

What really assisted with washing away the salt was my Mission Ave Mule. It’s a typical mule cocktail mix with vodka, lime, and ginger. Riverbank Bistro took it up a notch by adding in blueberry. I could clearly taste the fruit in the beverage with every sip, but they also decorate the top of the drink with frozen blueberries as an extra touch. My only wish is that for $13 it came in a bigger cup. I really had to savour that drink slowly.

Key Lime Pie

To cap off our dinner, we decided to share the Key Lime Pie ($10) for dessert. This was plated beautifully on a large white backdrop with colourful dollops of puree and pieces of fruit. It was creative and playful. The pie was delicious with a filling that leaned towards creamy instead of spongy. It was smooth and had a pleasant zestiness. The crust was also different from a basic pie since they incorporated coconut into it giving it a toasty flavour that married well with the key lime.

Despite the initial revelation that their regular menu was not available on Sunday, it turned out to be a pretty good meal. It gave the two of us an idea of the potential that lies in Riverbank Bistro. With the mains, maybe they just had more of an off night since I do believe that improvements are needed. But, wow, did they do a great job with things like their appetizers and dessert. I also think that the service was excellent (aside from one forgetful moment where we were brought our bill prior to our dessert coming out). We’re definitely willing to give Riverbank Bistro another shot as long as we visit on a Tuesday to Saturday instead.

Edmonton Business Review: Awake Coffee House

The cafe side of Awake Coffee House.

I’ve been on a bit of a coffeehouse kick lately. They’re just really great places to go for meetings, and, since I’ve had many a get together over the past month, it’s ideal to have multiple options. One that I visited recently is called Awake Coffee House. Located at 11029 9 Avenue, it’s easily accessible for those on the south side. If coming from the Henday, just exit on 111 Street heading north, and it’ll be the first turn on the right hand side.

When my fiancé and I drove up to the building on a Saturday afternoon, it was incredibly quiet. The parking lot only had a few cars in it. We also immediately noted that it was attached to Twin Brooks Medical Clinic. Upon walking into the actual coffee shop, I did take in the clean, modern space of the cafe, but I also thought that the pharmacy on the other side was a bit odd.

The spacious seating area separates the cafe from the pharmacy on the other side.

The medical clinic has a door that connects into Awake Coffee House, so that patients can easily come in and put through their prescriptions. While that’s convenient, I have to say I’m not super keen on hanging out in a cafe where there’s greater potential of people who have succumb to illness hanging out there. Yet, that is apparently a strategic business decision of the Song sisters who own both the cafe and the pharmacy. As registered pharmacists, they wanted a more welcoming spot for people to wait as their prescriptions were being prepared. While I see it from their side, it’s not exactly my cup of tea.

I really liked the touches of mint/teal throughout.

Luckily, it was pretty empty that day. We were able to sit almost anywhere we wanted to. Some of the tables were more communal. Others were smaller and could be grouped should that be required. They have a suitable selection of beverages. In my case, I ordered a Small Chai Latte ($5), which was presented in a larger than expected simple teal mug. I found that to be a nice touch since the colour matched the rest of the design scheme seen throughout Awake Coffee House — greys on the floor, natural woods on the tables and counter, whites on the seats and lights, and teal/mint on the stools and chair bottoms.

Small Chai Latte

I’ve read mixed reviews about the drinks served at Awake Coffee House with the majority of the negative coming from around the time they opened over a year ago. Most people cited watered down beverages. This was my first and only visit so far; however, based on my Chai Latte, I think they’ve made improvements because it was really good. Not only was the size decent for the price (most places charge a similar amount for this beverage), but it was incredibly flavourful. They certainly didn’t skimp when preparing the latte. It also had a pleasant amount of foam action on the top and they dusted it with an extra helping of spice before serving, adding to the overall taste once it was all stirred in.

There’s a wall of greeting cards near the door.

Awake Coffee House also makes bubble waffles on the weekend! I refrained from getting one this last time. Nevertheless, it’s on my list of things to try when we return. I have my eye on the dessert style Pina Colada Bubble Waffle that I saw on their Instagram page a while ago, so I hope they keep it on the menu. Although I probably won’t be back super often, when and if I do go, I’ll probably stick to weekend afternoons, especially Sundays when the clinic isn’t open. For a germaphobe like me, it’s just preferable. Otherwise, there’s no denying that Awake Coffee House is super cute, and the idea behind it is certainly commendable.

Edmonton Restaurant Review: Blowers & Grafton

Relaxing with a pint at Blowers & Grafton.

Driving down Whyte Avenue earlier this summer, I noticed the facade of a new establishment called Blowers & Grafton (10550 82 Avenue). Touting itself as a place for Halifax Street Food, I was immediately excited since Kirk is from New Brunswick and I had a hunch that he’d like it. Nonetheless, at the time, it was put on the back burner. Then, fast forward about a month when we decided to meet up with some friends for a bite to eat over the first weekend of the 37th Annual Edmonton International Fringe Theatre Festival. This ended up being our pick of the day.

Blowers & Grafton has a casual space with a distinctly East Coast feel.

We arrived just before 3 o’clock in the afternoon on a Saturday. The place was about three-quarters full and we managed to get seated right away. It’s actually quite a nice space with tables spread out well, so customers aren’t draped over each other. There’s a distinctly vintage rustic industrial design with open ceilings, original beams, brick, lots of stained woods, Edison bulbs screwed into pipes, warehouse-style pendant lighting, and upholstered metal stools. The only shots of colour in the place come from the reddish faux brick walls and a faded denim shade as seen on the seats and towards the back of the pub. To decorate, they’ve hung historic photographs of Halifax throughout. As our friends mentioned, the Edmonton location is much better than the initial hole in the wall built in Calgary. Overall, it’s comfortable and it immediately feels like a decent hang out spot.

So, for those who aren’t aware, Blowers & Grafton is a famous intersection in Halifax otherwise known as Pizza Corner. It laid claim to the name due to the number of shops that populated each quarter of the crossing streets. I’ve only been there once before and, if I recall, it’s no longer overrun with pizza. Although, other snacks like poutine may give the pies a run for their money. Both of those items are definitely on offer here, along with donairs, fish n’ chips, clams, scallops, and mussels.

The elusive B&G bottles. They’re hoping to stock these here as well. These were just a treat from the owner.

They have made a concerted effort to stock East Coast beers for half of their taps; however four of the six are standards like Alexander Keith’s and Moosehead. The rest of the options are Canadian brews with two coming from Alberta. This includes a B&G Wheat ($6.50) created specifically for Blowers & Grafton, likely by Minhas Micro Brewery out of Calgary as that company also created their standard bottled lager, which is currently only served at the Calgary location. NOTE: Happy Hour drink specials happen Monday to Friday from 3pm to 6pm and Sunday to Thursday from 9pm to close. Check my YEG Food Deals page for details.

The Bluenoser Cocktail

They also have an adequate cocktail list from which I selected The Bluenoser (our lovely server suggested it). In a mason glass was mixed a vodka base with St-Germain liqueur to give it a hint of elderflower. Additionally, flavours of lemon, lavender, blueberry and mint made up the remainder of the recipe. Honestly, considering the short cup, it didn’t seem to consist of two ounces of alcohol; this beverage was incredibly drinkable. I absolutely recommend stirring it up before sipping on it though. It’ll ensure that all of the ingredients meld together to create a full profile. Otherwise, it can be rather bland at first.

Foodwise, Kirk had his heart set on the Garlic Fingers ($13.50) with Bacon Bits ($2). I chose the Mini Lobster Rolls ($22). Our friends went for the Garlic Fingers (a group with three Maritimers cannot share a single order peacefully), too, and they added a basket of Brothers Fried Pepperoni on the side ($13).

I’ll admit, whenever Kirk raves about the almighty garlic finger from back home, I wonder what the big deal is. Hasn’t he ever heard of the cheesy bread found on the majority of menus at pizza shops galore? But, I digress. Yes, the Garlic Fingers are delicious (especially when fresh out of the oven). They take their homemade pizza dough and smother it in garlic butter and mozzarella cheese. You really can’t go wrong with a dish like that. What I think differentiates East Coast garlic fingers from anything similar is probably the sweet donair sauce provided for dipping. Blowers & Grafton does a good job and I’ve been told that they’re Kirk approved.

Mini Lobster Rolls

In my mind, the Mini Lobster Rolls could use a bit of improvement. These were comprised of decently sized pieces of real Atlantic Lobster tossed with mayo, lemon and fresh dill. I thought the mayo was a little light handed and I wasn’t a huge fan of the bed of tasteless slaw that the lobster sat on. It also didn’t need lobster butter on top. What was done right was the searing of the mini buns in butter. As for the sides, there were only two choices that didn’t require an extra cost: fries or chips. I opted for the latter. They were crispy and delicious and served with a basic ketchup. All in all, these were alright. Yet, for the quality and amount of food I received I can’t really justify the high price. If they had wowed me, maybe. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case.

Brothers Fried Pepperoni

Surprisingly, I think the Brothers Fried Pepperoni was the best thing I sampled from the Blowers & Grafton menu. The portion size was generous, the sausage was sliced thick, it wasn’t as greasy as I expected, and it came with a delicious honey mustard that was made in-house. While we went with the mild pepperoni, it’s available hot as well. Keep in mind though, the mild was still relatively spicy (nothing crazy, but there was a noticeable kick of heat).

Blueberry Grunt Donuts

Finally, it was time for a sweet finish. The only dessert they make is their Blueberry Grunt Donut ($1.50 each). A tad larger than a Timbit, it is relatively easy to fit in at least one at the end of a meal. The deep fried pastry dough was drizzled in blueberry grunt compote and maple syrup dulce de leche. It’s kind of rich because of the syrup, but with such a small dose, it’s manageable and worth it.

Before we left, we had a chat with a couple of the owners. They’re both extremely friendly and they were happy to discuss the expansion from Calgary to Edmonton. In fact, it’s going so well that they hope to make it even bigger down south. It never occurred to me before, but I suppose East Coast eats are a thing and there is a large enough customer base looking for this type of menu — a memory of home — in the Prairies. Being one of the first to bring Maritime street food here, Blowers & Grafton may just corner the market in the west.

Edmonton Business Review: The Colombian Coffee Bar & Roastery

It’s hard to miss The Colombian when driving west on Stony Plain Road.

Today, I thought I’d give a shout out to The Colombian Coffee Bar & Roastery. Those who know me well may be wondering why I’d be so bold as to write about a coffee shop when I don’t actually drink the beverage. Yet, this relatively new business is located in my old neighbourhood of Glenora and I thought I’d shine a light on it. Situated on 134 Street and Stony Plain Road, it sits right next to Vi’s for Pies, an area favourite.

When Kirk and I arrived at The Colombian on a Sunday afternoon, they were just a couple of hours away from closing up for the day. The place was packed with the majority of tables already taken. It’s a very long, narrow space, and they’ve done a pretty good job with it, so it doesn’t feel tight and claustrophobic. The high, open ceilings painted white definitely help. Otherwise, it’s pretty basic with minimal colours, simple wooden tables, chairs and benches, and industrial style pendant lighting.

The narrow space of The Colombian’s interior.

Once we ordered our drinks and my snack, we, at first, sat along a bench that faces their store shelves. T-shirts, cups, and bags of their house roasted coffee were up for grabs. It was sort of an awkward spot though. With tiny built-in tables, it kind of reminded me of the pop-up desks found in auditorium classrooms throughout university. Eyeing an empty back corner with a bench and a big tree stump table, we made a beeline for that instead.

Although there is a decent amount of seating in The Colombian, I don’t believe it’s necessarily meant to be comfortable. The solid benches are hard and most of the chairs are more like miniature stools without backs, offering little to no upper body support. Maybe that’s on purpose. Maybe it was just a cost saver. Regardless, I got the sense that the setting was more conducive to quick stays.

Drip Coffee and a Chai Latte ready to go, if needed.

Still, I enjoyed our time there and would be very interested to see how their coffee is made (the back of the shop is cordoned off and that is where they roast). Kirk ordered a simple Drip Coffee ($3.75 for a large). It smelled lovely, but he admitted he overdid it on the milk and sugar, so the true flavour was masked. Therefore, I can’t even give a proper second hand account of the coffee. From what I’ve read of other reviews, they have plenty of fans, so I’d recommend trying them out for yourself, if there’s an opportunity to go.

I sampled their Chai Latte ($5.50 for a large). It’s somewhat pricey; however, it was brewed and mixed with the milk well. Served at the perfect temperature for me, I thought the spices they used were super flavourful. They even garnished the light foam with extra cinnamon to give it some added oomph. I appreciated that as a serious cinnamon lover.

For those who are just hanging out with friends and would prefer something stronger, they offer a few draughts on tap and house wine. The options are few, but at least they are there.

As for the food, I’ve heard that they make a mean avocado toast. Personally, I’m a a tad weary to order it because there’s cilantro in the recipe, and I don’t want to throw $7 down the drain if I end up disliking it. Yet, anyone who doesn’t mind cilantro should give it a shot and let me know what they think.

The Pain au Chocolat was delectable.

Alternatively, I opted for a Pain au Chocolat ($3.60). It was freaking delicious and I had to ask where they came from. The answer was that they are baked in-house daily, but the pastries themselves are made in France. The company that prepares them flash freezes the dough before shipping them out to their vendors. They tasted fresh as if I bought it at a bakery in Paris. The pastry was soft and just a bit flaky, so everything still held together with each bite. The dark chocolate was divine, too. I’m not sure if the rest of their pastries are made in this manner as well. Either way, eat them all because I’m fairly certain they’ll be just as wonderful.

Part way through our time there, a server brought over a couple glasses of water for us. I thought that was a nice touch as we didn’t ask for anything. When I looked around, I noticed that they had done the same with everyone else. Talk about service! Before we left, one of the owners even popped by to do refills.

The coffee bar inside The Colombian.

The Colombian is most definitely a fantastic addition to Glenora. This is a neighbourhood that is pretty devoid of local cafes. Short of going another ten blocks to the east on 124 Street or about nine blocks in the opposite direction to 143 Street, there isn’t anything else like it in the vicinity. If our brief visit was any indication, The Colombian will be a staple here. I lost count of the number of people who came in and out in the hour we were there, and that’s a really great sign.

Edmonton Restaurant Review: DOSC Restaurant

DOSC Bar

Sometimes a business comes along and it completely changes the game. After a handful of visits since they opened a month ago, I’d now safely say that DOSC Restaurant is one that falls in that category. Located on 104 Street and 102 Avenue in the downtown core of Edmonton, it resides in a seemingly “cursed” space (four other eateries have shut down in the past few years); however, I’m truly hoping that this ambitious cafe/bar/steakhouse defies the odds.

Previously, upon the launch of DOSC, I had written a preview post about my experience at one of their media dinners. It was a night that I’ll remember for a long time to come, not only because of the offerings and the people, but also for the showmanship. Today, I really want to delve into the menu, focusing on all of the food and drinks I’ve had the pleasure of trying thus far.

After the dinner Kirk and I attended before their official opening, I wasn’t too keen on putting an actual review of the food out there right away. While we got to sample an array of items that they would be serving at the restaurant, I didn’t know what the actual size of the dishes would be like and, of course, during a media event, it’s always going to be their best foot forward. So, it was hard to judge the place properly based off of the one night.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Plates that we were presented with at the preview event included: Tostada, Pate, Sweetbreads & Tendons, Wagyu Tartare, Marrow Mash, Pickled Asparagus, Liver & Onions, Tongue, Brisket, Miyazaki Chuck Wagyu, Hickory Smoked Chocolate, and Pineapple Cake. Almost every one still resides on the current soft opening menu in some form or another. As they continue to receive feedback they are tweaking the dishes to find the best fit. Eventually, the tongue to tail menu will be expanded to fully encompass the whole animal as available options, at the moment, are limited to slightly more common offals.

Tostada

Personally, I wasn’t a big fan of the Liver & Onions more due to the metallic taste than the texture. I also wouldn’t necessarily go out of my way to order the Sweetbreads & Tendons, which were cooked until very tender, but just not a mouthfeel that I’m too keen on. Everything else was excellent though. I especially liked the Tostada with its layers of chipotle crema, salsa verde, feta, Brussels sprouts, avocado mousse and quail egg. It was light and complex. Hints of Chef de Cuisine Israel Alvarez’s Mexican upbringing shone through and it was a standout. It used to be found on their breakfast menu, but is now listed on their dinner menu and served with beef tongue ($12).

Tongue

Speaking of the tongue, the only way to try this fantastic selection right now is with the Tostada. Their latest menu was recently updated, taking away the choice of ordering the tongue in three, six or nine ounce portions. Still, take a chance on it. Tongue is typically quite tough. Here, at DOSC, they cook it sous vide until it’s incredibly tender, like the best cut of steak.

Wagyu Tartare

I have a tendency to lean towards tartares. The Wagyu version ($18) here is exceptional. The meat melts in your mouth and it pairs well with the potato bread that they make in-house. Just be aware that the portion of meat is only about three ounces, so it’s not a lot. Wagyu is pricey as it is, let alone to be importing it to Edmonton, so it’s understandable that it’s not going to be the usual amount of beef tartare that may be seen at other local establishments.

Miyazaki Chuck Wagyu

If money’s no object, do order the Miyazaki Wagyu ($59 for six ounces or $88 for 9 ounces). I’d probably opt for the rib eye cut with the horseradish, volcanic salt and arugula butter. The meat has a beautiful flavour and a gorgeous texture.

Both of the sweets were fantastic. The Pineapple Cake ($9) is served upside down with a walnut honey ricotta, salted rum caramel and tarragon créme. It’s very decadent and quite sweet. Some think it’s sacrilegious to share dessert, but this one and their tart (to be discussed below) are perfect to be split. Their ice cream and sorbet, on the other hand, are recommended for one. The Hickory Smoked Chocolate Sorbet ($9) is to die for. Last I’d noticed, it’s still being served at the table in a bell jar filled with smoke. It’s kind of theatric and fun to order for that reason alone. The sorbet is made with Mayan 70 per cent dark chocolate, morita flake (chili) and smoked espresso salt. Creamier than expected, it’s got a distinct smokiness to it while retaining a little sweetness and a hint of spice at the end.

DOSC Bar Menu

We found ourselves downtown one weekend shortly after and decided to drop in for a night cap. This time, we sat in their cafe, which is towards the front of the space with windows overlooking 104 Street. It’s comfortable and cozy with such a pretty cafe counter. We started off with some alcoholic beverages. Those who lean towards beer will have a decent local selection (think Blindman Brewing, etc.) from their twelve rotating taps. In fact, one of my favourites that they seem to keep regularly is the WTF Raspberry Sour from Situation Brewing (around $8).

For those who prefer cocktails, they have a stellar team at the bar. The Rose + Leaf ($11) and Transom Sour ($11) are my drinks of choice. Both are great to sip through dinner, although the Rose + Leaf, with it’s underlying flavour of lychee and top note of watermelon, is more refreshing and ideal for those hot summer days. They even have a few mocktails on the menu for anyone who doesn’t or can’t imbibe.

Matcha Latte

In terms of the DOSC cafe, I find the cost of the drinks to be pretty much on par with any other specialty coffee shop in the city. The beans here come from Rogue Wave Coffee. Unfortunately, I don’t drink coffee, so I can’t really talk much about that. My beverage of late is definitely their Matcha Latte ($5). While most other places in Edmonton mix ones that are much sweeter, their baristas use pure matcha with milk. It results in a much stronger flavour. For some, it may be too bitter, but I love it.

Our third visit was with friends over supper. We went to town that night. Kirk ended up ordering the 16 oz. T-Bone Steak ($30). This was pan seared and simply seasoned with salt and extra pepper. The flavour of the meat was allowed to come through rather than masking it with a heavy sauce. On the side, they put a dollop of their freshly grated purple horseradish that has been pickled with cabbage, sherry and corn nectar. It works really well with the beef. To go with the steak, Kirk also went for their Daily Bread ($4). Kirk thought it was delicious, but with just two slices of the bread and a square of cultured butter, it was a tad expensive. Had the slices been thicker, the bread may have been justifiable, but they were very thin pieces. He also chose the Russet Fries ($5), which were an amazing starch. Thick, hand cut potatoes are whole wheat crusted, infusing them with an intense flavour and creating a nice crisp outer shell.

I had enjoyed the tongue so much at the media dinner that I had to have it again as my protein on this evening. I selected the three ounce size for $6, and it actually seemed like a more generous portion than that. It was also prepared as well as I remembered. I combined that dish with their Brussels Sprouts ($8) and Brown Barley Fried Rice ($9). Between the two sides, the Brussels sprouts was, hands down, the better. Don’t get me wrong, I liked the rice with it’s leeks, funghi, crispy ginger egg, and pickled shallot, but it had almost too slick of a texture over the rice and the mushrooms were a little bland. The Brussels sprouts were awesome though! Big, round Brussels were cooked thoroughly. The outer leaves were charred and crisp. Tossed with large, perfectly cooked pancetta and using an egg white foam and cured yolk as a sauce, it’s like no other Brussels sprout dish I’ve ever had.

Citrus Tart

Finishing off our date night, Kirk and I shared the Citrus Tart ($9). Made with whisked egg yolks to create a sabayon custard, this dessert utilizes a handful of citruses: lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, and yuzu. It holds their essence without becoming overly sour and the sugariness is light, too. On the palate, the pastry shell is more like a butter cookie and the custard is creamy.

My latest visit was with another friend of mine for an early dinner after work this week. We decided to share four items. Since we both have an affinity for Brussels sprouts, that was a repeat dish. Yet, I did make a point of trying some new to me things: Pappardelle ($9) and Skirt Steak ($13 for 6 ounces). We also got a bowl of the Marrow Mash ($5). Regarding the latter, this is just such a rich take on mashed potatoes. The use of marrow makes the Yukon potatoes taste butterier than butter itself. The herb oil is a nice touch, adding a bit of earthiness. Stir it up to get the best flavour profile. The green pappardelle is freshly made and tossed with garlic leek, roasted garlic oil, kampot red peppercorn, and lemon. The oil makes it a little slippery in texture, but the overall taste is great and it’s different from the typical saucy pasta.

Skirt Steak

The star of the evening was definitely the skirt steak. This cut is smoked with juniper and dry rubbed with espresso cocoa grounds from Rogue Wave Coffee. It’s delectable. My friend, who isn’t even a huge fan of steak, said it was her favourite dish of the night. Usually, skirt steak is not the best cut to order. It can often be overcooked and chewy. DOSC handles the meat with precision. Seared so the juices stay in the steak, it’s actually superbly succulent. No word of a lie, it’s probably one of the best things I’ve eaten in a while.

Earl Grey Ice Cream

Added to the dessert menu this week was an Earl Grey Ice Cream ($9). It was infused with orange and rosemary and topped with sponge toffee. I’m usually not one to order ice cream from a restaurant as it’s sort of costly for what you’re getting. But, it was the only dessert I hadn’t tried. I’m also weary of tea-flavoured desserts because it’s often the case that the flavour doesn’t come through enough. Surprisingly, DOSC managed to saturate the ice cream with the earl grey taste.

DOSC seems to have found early success. Patrons steadily come in and out whenever I’ve been there, and, on weekends, it’s clearly a bustling place until closing. From my perspective, DOSC is getting better and better. Each time I go, it’s evolving and improving. The service is impeccable and the team behind it is fantastic. Honestly, my hope is that it’s just too good to fail.