Edmonton Restaurant Review: Café Linnea

Brunch at Café Linnea.

Well into its second year of business, Café Linnea has already accomplished a lot as far as new endeavours go. Being the brainchild of the owners behind Duchess Bake Shop, it’s no wonder that what started off as a local brunch destination (now also open for dinner) has become a favourite within Edmonton as well as on a national level. In 2017, Air Canada named it the sixth best new restaurant in the country. The accolades have been steady, and, with that, so has the hype.

During a busy day scouting out venues across the city, I decided to drag my fiancé here for sustenance. We arrived at around 10:45am on a Saturday morning. From what I understand, Café Linnea works on a first come, first serve basis. Reservations are only taken for large groups and, even then, they set aside a the majority of tables for walk-ins. Still, we had good timing because there was no one ahead of us and we were seated within minutes.

Once I settled in, I examined the room. It kind of has this outdoors brought indoors look with greenery inside a low concrete planter wall, skylights, big windows, retro chairs, bright white walls with splashes of colour, and natural wood tables and shelves. I totally think of minimalist Scandinavian design when I view it, and I suppose it’s meant to match the Scandinavian inspired dishes.

We perused the menu. While my significant other opted to stick with water, I decided to splurge on a glass of their feature juice ($6.50). On this particular day, it was a lovely deep pink that tasted like grapefruit and raspberry. If I remember correctly, I believe there was also lychee in there as well. However, I couldn’t taste it. Overall though, it was refreshing. I just wish the glass was bigger for something that costs so much.

Turning our attention to the food, my fiancé chose the Chicken Pot Pie ($22) and I went with the Fig & Cheese Galette ($17) with added House Bacon ($5). Both of these selections are considered mains, so they are meant to be filling.

I have to say, the Fig & Cheese Galette isn’t quite what I was hoping for. The menu description is detailed: “A buckwheat crêpe with fresh honey roasted fig, fig compote, today’s selection of soft, French cheese, smoked hazelnuts, finished with a drizzle of honey.” What I thought would be a mix of savoury and sweet, fell towards the latter.

 

There was way too much of the fig compote. I’d hazard a guess that they simply emptied out a whole jar of the compote with giant dollops placed right onto the slightly flavourless grainy crêpe. The extra honey simply took the sugariness to another level. The smoked hazelnuts and the cheese helped to a point, but, in the end, they failed to provide enough of a balance. The best part in an otherwise mess was definitely the honey roasted fig, which I loved for the natural flavour and texture. Thankfully, I listened to the server’s suggestion about the bacon. Without it, I would have been severely disappointed in this dish. The house bacon brought a necessary saltiness that offset all of that sweetness and saved my meal.

On the other hand, the Chicken Pot Pie was a winner. As described by my future husband, it was “like the equivalent of a peaty scotch — complex, subtle, and smoky.” This was absolutely delicious. Although I could have done without a couple of full-on bites of pure fat from the meat used (not a fan of that type of mouthfeel), everything else about it was fantastic.

 

The poached egg atop the flaky pie crust broke open to reveal a gorgeous runny yolk that seeped right into the bowl of béchamel sauce that lay hidden beneath the pie top. The sauce itself came across like a delicious creamy soup and the veggies that resided there were cooked until perfectly tender. The accompanying green salad had an earthy flavour and a light vinaigrette, but it was so tiny. Unless there’s enough salad to truly help one get their greens in, it may as well have been omitted. The Chicken Pot Pie is definitely for diet cheat days, not for those wanting a healthy brunch.

Before we made it to Café Linnea, I had fully intended on ordering a starter or a dessert to build a complete picture. Yet, by the time we finished our plates, there was no way I could squeeze in anything more. So, at this point, what I ate has me sitting on the fence between all of the good publicity they’ve received versus the reality of our experience. Regardless, Café Linnea does have a great atmosphere and pretty decent service even if the food is somewhat hit or miss. I’ll probably have to give it another go down the road (I’ve got my eye on their Tuesday Prix-Fixe dinners). In the meantime, I stand by what I’ve said here. If one plans to visit, you’ve been forewarned about the Fig & Cheese Galette.

Edmonton Restaurant Review: Chartier

Start with dessert first: Banana Phone on a vintage plate.

I follow a lot of Edmonton’s local and surrounding restaurants on social media. Included in the mix is Chartier, a French-Canadian eatery out of Beaumont. Known for their elevated take on rustic dishes, it wasn’t their regular menu that pulled me into their establishment. Instead, I was enticed by their weekly Tuesday night burgers, specifically the Fall menu from September 19 that was posted on Instagram.

Chartier has a great story. Starting with the name, owners Sylvia and Darren Cheverie dug into the history books to learn of a man named Father Morin who travelled to Ottawa from Alberta in 1895 to petition for a post office to be placed in the small French colony from which he came. In order to do so, he needed to present potential names for the community. Of the three possibilities, ‘Beaumont’ is the one that stuck. ‘Chartier’ went unused until the couple launched a Kickstarter as a way to fund their dream of opening a local eatery. It ended up becoming the most successful restaurant campaign in Alberta and Canada on the crowdfunding platform, raising over $107,000 in just two months.

Approximately one year after they had raised the money, the restaurant opened in March of 2016 to rave reviews of chef Steven Brochu’s offerings. Another year and a half later, Chartier was listed as one of 30 finalists vying to become Canada’s Best New Restaurant for 2017 by Air Canada. That accolade, along with a unique, limited-edition menu, spurred my first visit.

My boyfriend and I drove from south Edmonton to downtown Beaumont within 20 minutes. There were no problems finding free on-street parking right outside the building, so we made it there for our 6:00 pm reservation (booked online through Yelp) with a few minutes to spare.

Entering through their threshold, you’re welcomed by a cozy waiting area that houses a cabinet of their own pantry items and branded products. Immediately past that space, a large bar and dining room is to be found. On this evening, the majority of their vintage, colourfully painted mismatched chairs were already filled with happy people. We were seated at a table for two near the kitchen. There, I was able to take peeks at the chefs as they worked. I also took my time appreciating the design of the venue. With cinnamon-maple stained columns and beams as well as reclaimed wood paneled walls, and a large barn door, that country charm really came into play.

The Fall Burger Menu

To get the night started, my other half ordered one of the draught beers. It seems that they only have a few on tap. Therefore, the choices were minimal. But, it’s okay because he still found a new beverage to try. As he waited for his drink to come, the two of us paged through a handful of sheets printed with their menus. To be honest, I barely even glanced at their usual dinner selection. Although, I will have to make a point of coming back to sample it down the road. My mind was completely set on those burgers. Of the four options, we decided to split the Messy Bun and Uggs ($21) and the PSL ($20).

The Messy Bun and Uggs was described as a six ounce sheep burger stuffed with bacon and cheese. It was put onto a house made messy bun (basically a cheese bun) and topped with smoky BBQ sauce and caramelized onions. Overall, it was well-made; both of us appreciated the juiciness of the meat and the barbecue flavour. Yet, it felt as though something was missing. Ultimately, it came down to the taste of the patty. The meat lacked that gameyness that is so strongly associated with sheep or lamb, and while it’s not always a palate pleaser for some, that’s what we had expected and wanted out of the meal. As it turned out, the burger simply tasted like beef.

Our side for this main was the Salade de Chartier. Tossed arugula, spinach, kale, pickled Brussels sprouts, and red onions were combined with roasted root vegetables in a peach maple mustard vinaigrette and topped with finely grated Sylvan Star Grizzly Gouda and candied walnuts. It was certainly a hearty salad, but I thought it started to become too salty. Sure, there were plenty of flavour profiles throughout the dish — tangy dressing, sweet walnuts, bitterness from the greens — but they were all overtaken by that single note in the end.

PSL with Wedge Fries

Our favourite of the pair of entrées was the PSL burger. Short for Pumpkin Spice Latte, I felt that this was where the kitchen’s creativity really excelled. The PSL consisted of a six ounce beef patty covered with whipped pumpkin chèvre, cinnamon, truffle, onion relish, sautéed mushrooms, and roasted garlic. It was literally autumn in burger form. What amazed me most was the fact that none of the flavours overwhelmed the others. I was able to pick out every ingredient with each bite that I took; I thought it was superb. In particular, I loved the use of cinnamon. I learned long ago that cinnamon is an amazing spice that can be used in all sorts of recipes to give them that je ne sais quoi quality. Here, it helped Chartier raise the pedestal of what a burger could be while simultaneously remaining down-to-earth. The side of hand-cut wedge fries were also delicious. Crisp on the outside with plenty of fluffy potato on the inside, I couldn’t stop eating them.

Banana Phone

Having reviewed the desserts earlier in the day, I knew I couldn’t leave without ordering one. We elected to go with the Banana Phone ($11). As I suspected, we chose well (our server even agreed that it was her preferred plate). Toasted banana bread served with brûlée banana, banana cream, and a scoop of tonka bean and Tahitian vanilla ice cream, this was worth the extra calories. Being easy to come by, bananas, which are often eaten as a quick snack, aren’t usually given lofty goals. But, in this instance, they were everything. I will admit that the banana bread was initially drier than I would have liked; however, the ice cream and the banana cream sauce quickly mitigated that potential misstep. What I truly appreciated was the simplicity of the banana halves torched with a thin layer of crunchy caramelized sugar. The sweetness wasn’t overwhelming; it was just right.

Now that I’ve actually eaten there firsthand, I can say that the praise they’ve received is deserved. Not only is the food at Chartier top-notch, I’d say the service is as well. The staff is welcoming, friendly and team-oriented.

Before we even left, my boyfriend was already planning our next date night at Chartier. As such, it’s safe to say that we’ll be back. Perhaps I’ll even attempt to drop by on occasion to pick up some baked goods from their bread window. From what I understand, they open the window strictly on weekends from Friday to Sunday. Yet, lately, on Instagram, I’ve noticed photos and posts about their lineup during the week as well. Either way, they’re definitely doing a good job of drawing me in again.

Until next time, Chartier!