The Travelling Concertgoer: San Francisco Photostream

Walking from the BART station to see the Rolling Stones at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, CA on May 5, 2013

Walking from the BART station to see the Rolling Stones at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, CA on May 5, 2013

I’m not sure about you, but I haven’t met anyone in my life who has said they don’t enjoy music. Most find a genre they like and the majority are pretty passionate about music in some form or another. Whether they’re a musician or just a lover of the lyrics, beats and rhythms that make up the variety of songs out there in the universe, there is literally something for everyone.

I’m one of those passionate ones. I find artists I love all the time and I remain a devoted fan throughout the majority of an artist or band’s career. The genres of music I listen to run the gambit. Everything from top 40 to rap to folk to country can probably be found in my playlist, so I’m lucky that I live in a city that has become one of the major stops on many a concert tour. However, there are still some artists that don’t quite make it to my city, let alone my country because they either haven’t managed to crack the North American market to the point that it’s worth their time to tour here extensively or they’re such bloody legends that they know people will follow them instead. I’ve travelled to New York and Montreal to see Kylie Minogue, Toronto to see U2, London, England to see Girls Aloud and this coming December to New York once again to see P!nk. But, just earlier this month, I booked a whirlwind trip to San Francisco to see the Rolling Stones.

Prior to the Rolling Stones announcing their 50 and Counting tour, they were still one of the bands on my musical bucket list, if you will. I admit when I was younger I wasn’t much of a fan. I never really listened to them much and wasn’t necessarily inclined to, but after about a year of working full-time at my first “real” job after graduating from university, in an effort to create a regularly occurring social event for my friends and I, I decided to start a movie club. One month, in 2008, we chose to see Shine A Light, a documentary about the Rolling Stones that was directed by Martin Scorsese. I went in excited to see it because it was a documentary about one of the world’s biggest bands seen through the eyes of one of the best filmmakers and I wasn’t disappointed. That was the day I fell in love with their music and the characters that make up this long lasting group that, despite the pitfalls that rock and roll has brought to others, has stayed together with its original lineup for half a century.

Last year when the Rolling Stones announced their November/December shows in London and New York I thought my chance was finally here. The last time they had come to Edmonton, AB was back in 1997, so I wasn’t holding my breath that they’d grace my hometown with their presence, but maybe they’d come to Vancouver? Well, it was a long wait before they officially announced cities and dates for 2013 and while the west coast of Canada didn’t make the cut, San Francisco did.

I was more than determined to see them. With Mick, Keith, Ronnie and Charlie between the ages of 65 and 71, this could very well be the last time they’ll perform on a tour like this and I couldn’t miss out. And, I wouldn’t call it fate exactly, but I do think it was by luck that I happened to come across the band’s $85 link on their website the morning the tickets for San Francisco went on sale. The catch with those tickets is that you could only purchase them in pairs and you wouldn’t know where your seats would be until you arrived at the venue and picked them up. That was perfectly fine with me! A chance to see the Rolling Stones at half the price of even their lowest priced tickets in the main sale meant I couldn’t go wrong.

The concert was superb. I loved seeing the crazy array of people at the venue. The audience was having such a great time, dancing like there was no tomorrow and Mick Jagger literally is more energetic at his age than I am right now. They played many of their hits, but with their extensive catalog, I missed hearing songs like Wild Horses or Ruby Tuesday. I can understand why people follow them around from city to city on their tours. They are notorious for changing up their sets every show, so they’re never exactly the same, and maybe, just maybe, you’ll hear your favourite song.

This is their set list from Oakland, CA on May 5:

  1. “Get Off Of My Cloud”
  2. “It’s Only Rock ‘N’ Roll (But I Like It)”
  3. “Live With Me”
  4. “Paint It Black”
  5. “Gimme Shelter”
  6. “Little Red Rooster” (with Tom Waits)
  7. “Dead Flowers”
  8. “Emotional Rescue”
  9. “All Down The Line”
  10. “Doom and Gloom”
  11. “One More Shot”
  12. “Honky Tonk Women”
  13. “Before They Make Me Run”
  14. “Happy”
  15. “Midnight Rambler” (with Mick Taylor)
  16. “Miss You”
  17. “Start Me Up”
  18. “Tumbling Dice”
  19. “Brown Sugar”
  20. “Sympathy for the Devil”

Encore

  1. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”
  2. “Jumping Jack Flash”
  3. “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”

Even after a 2 and a half hour show, I still wished it was longer. But, alas, I can now say that I have seen the Rolling Stones live. The experience was certainly worth the trip, and though they’re the reason why I booked a vacation to San Francisco, I do try to make the most of my time in the cities I visit.

Over my three days in the home of the Golden Gate Bridge, I visited the Ferry Building on the Embarcadero and perused the stalls at the weekly farmer’s market, walked the streets of Chinatown, shopped around Union Square, ate at Tadish in the Financial District (apparently the oldest seafood restaurant in San Francisco) and at Bask SF (only a year old), walked up Lombard Street, followed Columbus Avenue from California Street past North Beach and all the way down to Hyde Street Pier and then down to Pier 39 to see the seals. I regret the shoes I brought with me because I thought those flats would kill me by the end of the trip, but I made it and it was fantastic.

Another trip and plenty to document it! As my friend said, she knew I must have just returned home and finally gotten Wi-Fi because I started Instagraming one photo after another to share with everyone. She also asked me how long I was there for, and when I replied that I was only there for three days, she was pretty amazed at how much I managed to do in such a short time span.

San Francisco through my eyes is here for you to view. Hopefully it inspires you to visit, too. Maybe for a show, maybe not. Either way, it’s worth seeing and with many things within walking distance of one another, you can cover a lot more ground than you think.

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#26ActsofKindness and Beyond

On Dec. 14, a tragedy took place in Newtown, Connecticut at the Sandy Hook Elementary School. A shooter, for reasons unknown, decided to take the life of his mother and then the lives of twenty children and six of their teachers in a rampage that is too hard to fathom. In honour and remembrance of those lost too soon, Ann Curry from NBC News took to twitter on Dec. 16 to ask if others would commit to twenty acts of kindness, one for every child taken. That snowballed into 26 (#26Acts or #26ActsofKindness), 27 and even 28 from those who wanted to take part.

This request came at a time of year when people are often feeling generous, loving and kind towards one another, usually more so than the rest of the year. And, though this holiday season is coming near an end for another year, the goodwill that is so abundant doesn’t need to stop.

I don’t believe what Ann Curry (@AnnCurry) came up with is anything new, but, regardless, the point of her idea is to spread joy in this world rather than hate or hurt, and I think that this is important for all of humanity to adhere to. If each of us can bring just an iota of happiness to one person, maybe that would be the key to preventing such horrible occurrences in the future. This can be a better world if we take the steps to make it so.

In an effort to get you started on your acts of kindness (random or not), which I hope will continue past twenty six, here are a number of small and big things that you can do.

1) Hold the door open for someone.

A simple gesture that is usually appreciated.

2) Donate toys and clothes that are no longer being used to a shelter.

3) Donate non-perishable food items to the food bank.

4) Babysit your friend’s kids, so he/she can have a night off.

It might not be your idea of a great night, but your friend will love you for giving up your day or evening so they can have a bit of a break.

It might not be your idea of a great night, but your friend will love you for giving up your day or evening so they can have a bit of a break.

5) All too often, what others do goes unnoticed. Recognize and acknowledge someone else’s hard work.

6) Donate a bus ride. Edmonton Transit System has a program. Maybe your city does as well.

7) Bake cookies for your co-workers.

My favourite kind of cookies!

My favourite kind of cookies!

8) If you have long hair, consider donating some of it towards wigs for cancer patients.

9) Smile and say good morning to a stranger, co-worker or friend.

10) Help carry someone’s bags.

Kids always want to help. We should emulate them.

Kids always want to help. We should emulate them.

11) Truly listen to people when they’re talking to you. You never know what you’ll learn or how you might be able to help if you don’t take the time to absorb what they’re saying.

12) When a co-worker is swamped with work and you’re not, offer to help them out.

13) #FF (Follow Friday) your Twitter friends.

If you think someone is worth following on Twitter, don't hog them to yourself. Share with others!

If you think someone is worth following on Twitter, don’t hog them to yourself. Share with others! But, make sure to give reasons why they should do so.

14) Clear away shopping carts that are blocking parking spots.

15) Surprise a friend by paying for their lunch, too.

16) Buy coffee for the next person in line.

They'll be glad for the free morning pick-me-up!

They’ll be glad for the free morning pick-me-up!

17) Volunteer at a non-profit agency.

18) Help your parents by picking up their groceries, cleaning their house, doing their yard, etc. Whatever they need and you’re able to do, even if it’s small, will be appreciated.

19) If you’re buying a cart full of groceries and the person behind you only has a few items, let them go first. They’ll be thankful they don’t have to wait so long and it will only keep you for a few more minutes.

Shopping cart

Those with a few items will appreciate your willingness to let them butt in front of you.

20) If you’re done with you shopping cart at the grocery store and someone else needs one, let them have it and your quarter.

21) If a friend is moving, offer to help them pack up their stuff or transport their things.

22) Drop off a care package and some homemade chicken noodle soup for a friend who’s feeling under the weather.

Chicken soup for the soul is always comforting.

Chicken soup for the soul is always comforting.

23) Support local artists by buying, viewing or listening to their work.

24) Give away a gift card you received to someone who needs it more.

25) Sometimes we take people for granted. Thank someone if they do something for you.

We often don't say this enough.

We often don’t say this enough.

26) Leave positive notes in random places for people to find.

27) Donate a party dress for upcoming graduates who may not be able to afford something on their own. There are various projects in many cities. Google to find one near you.

28) Adopt a pet from the local animal shelter.

Improve your emotional well being and provide a home.

Improve your emotional well being and provide a home.

29) Be a snow angel and shovel a neighbours walkway and driveway or clear off their car.

30) Donate blood.

31) Tell someone special how much you care about them.

This is something a lot of people forget to do. Don't leave it until it's too late.

This is something a lot of people forget to do. Don’t leave it until it’s too late.

32) On the road, let someone merge into your lane if they need to.

33) Help someone bag their groceries at self-checkout.

34) Hug a friend.

Getting a hug always makes me feel special and brightens my day!

Getting a hug always makes me feel special and brightens my day!

35) Set aside $1 a day for a year and once you’ve collected the $365 donate it to the charity or agency of your choice.

36) Send a care package to a friend or family member who is far away from home.

37) Light candles in honour of those who have passed.

Each flame is representative of the soul of someone meaningful to you.

Each flame is representative of the soul of someone meaningful to you.

38) If your parking ticket hasn’t expired, pass it onto someone who can still use it.

39) Be a mentor.

40) Help someone wrap gifts, decorate for a party or bake a birthday cake. Or bake a cake for your best friend just because.

I love coconut anything.

I love coconut anything.

41) Be kind to yourself. Sometimes we worry so much about others that we forget to take care of ourselves.

This list is by no means comprehensive. However, I included whatever I was able to think of over the last few days. I tried to come up with a variety of things – some might require a bit of money, but most can be done without. It’s all about the gestures and paying it forward.

If you have other ideas to add, please share them in the comments section below.

Peace and Love,

Crystal

Feeling Nostalgic

1950’s Oceanic Surcouf French Valve Radio

I am currently the teaching assistant for a course about using and managing communication technologies. Essentially the class covers the history of the subject and a couple of weeks ago the topic up for discussion was the radio. The professor asked each of the students to share their memories of the technology in the hopes of finding someone else who related to the medium on an ethereal and intimate level just as he had as a child.

Growing up in a time when television played a larger role in my childhood and the computer was becoming the norm, I didn’t quite fit the bill of a radio listener. In fact, I’ve always had a love-hate relationship with the format. You can’t choose what you listen to and the advertisements bothered me to no end because it seemed like when one station had them on, every other station did as well. But, after reading some of the responses from the students, I saw how important the radio was to them. It presented an escape for them when there was nothing else at their disposal. The radio triggered their imagination with one student recalling how they listened to hockey games and the play-by-plays made them feel like they were actually there seeing the game live and in-person.

This discussion made me think about how I sometimes long for a previous time in my life. I’m feeling more and more lately like we’re inundated with too much information and that we’re too accessible. We’re constantly tethered to devices and people. Instead of separating personal and work lives, we’re available through our smart phones at all times. Since when did it become okay for work to seep into evenings and weekends?

I wish I still had the time to sit in my living room creating the perfect mix tapes like I did when I was a teenager. I’d pick out the songs and time it all so that I could get the most out of both sides. How many of you remember doing that?

When I didn’t have a care in the world, I would re-watch a movie over and over again until I memorized all the lines. I did that with Legally Blonde and Zoolander. But, then you grow up and there never seems to be enough time to do the laundry and the dishes, fit a workout in, pay the bills, run your errands or walk the dog, among a million other things. For many people, that carefree feeling that we used to have somehow goes out the door as we get older.

My memories of being a kid running around at recess, sitting on the school steps playing with pogs, walking to the neighbourhood general store with a friend to pick up a slushie or some five cent candies feel like they happened forever ago.

I think, in the end, what I’m trying to say here is that we can’t forget how we grew up and what made us happy when we were younger. When you feel nostalgic, call up your best friend and ask them to take a walk with you to the corner store like you did when you were kids or make yourself the perfect mix CD for your next road trip. You deserve to take the time out for yourself, to go back to a time when you had no obligations, even if only for an hour, an afternoon or a day.

I’d love to hear about what makes you feel nostalgic. Please share in the comments section below.

Photo source: http://thebakeliteradio.com

Hoarding in the Digital Age

A sampling of some of my own Pinterest boards.

 

We’ve all heard about hoarding; pack rats gone extreme. Hoarding: Buried Alive on TLC shows us the devastation it can bring by taking us into the homes of people who have serious issues letting go and keeping clean. It’s a scary reality that has possibly touched you or someone you know.

I’m glad to say that even as someone who loves to collect things – shoes, clothes, movies, albums, etc. – it has never gotten to the point to where I’ve thought all my stuff would one day literally smother me. But, with so much being accessible online these days, and our increasing affinity as a society to “favorite” things as we surf the Internet, I began to think that our digital world is not unlike real life hoarding.

How many of you have a favorites list on your Internet browser that is so long you don’t remember everything that’s there? Do you keep it all organized?

The epiphany that we have become collectors of digital content came to me as I sat at my computer late one night liking things and pinning things to my boards on Pinterest. It’s an addictive site. Everywhere you go online, if you see something you like, you can add it to your boards. It’s the instant gratification of having something without truly needing to possess it. Digital life has allowed us to become pack rats without the physical luggage.

Worst of all, I believe it’s increasing our prevalance as human beings to procrastinate. It’s making us less proactive. Our “save for later mentality” has grown stronger. The more we pin, the more we save, the more time it takes to click and read everything we’ve set aside, the less likely we will be to go back and view it all.

Yet, I’m not ready or willing to give up my Pinterest boards or my favorites. I’d much rather be a hoarder of digital images and links as opposed to a hoarder of real life clutter.

What I love most about Pinterest is the ability for us to share what we love with others whether they be friends or strangers. Not only can I save things, but I can find DIY instructions, recipes, products, music videos, wedding ideas and more that I might never have come across on my own. For now, Pinterest is my new addiction. It feeds my materialistic side without the requirement of physical space or money.

What do you think about digital hoarding? Is it harmful? Is it the best thing that’s come along in awhile? What’s on your Pinterest boards?

Please comment below and be sure to include your own Pinterest links. I would be glad to check out what you’ve been sharing with others.

And, feel free to follow me on Pinterest at http://pinterest.com/carwinlee/.